About

Since July 2015, I have been working in Quantitative Strategies at Credit Suisse. Before that, I completed my PhD on Gravitational Waves at the University of Cambridge.

I studied for my PhD at the Institute of Astronomy under the supervision of Dr Jonathan Gair. I have been a member of Corpus Christi College since starting my graduate research in 2011, prior to which I was an undergraduate student at St. Catharine's College, studying Natural Sciences.

I'm interested in the science that can be done with gravitational waves, which can be thought of as ripples in the fabric of spacetime. They offer a unique perspective on the Universe, distinct from standard electromagnetic observations. As such, there is the potential of making huge new discoveries!

In particular, for my doctoral research, I am investigating techniques to accelerate convergence in Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, as applied in the field of gravitational wave astronomy. I use a waveform interpolation scheme to analytically smooth the likelihood surface within the parameter space of a particular model. More details can be found on the arXiv.

I also study the effect of transient resonances in extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, astrophysical systems consisting of a stellar mass compact object spiralling in towards a supermassive black hole. I've also spent some time looking at the trajectories of spinning test particles.

You can read more about my work on the research pages.

During my undergraduate career, I undertook a series of summer internships, researching a variety of topics across the globe.

  • CERN - I was involved with the LHCb Collaboration, studying an upgrade to one of the detector systems.
  • Caltech (LIGO) - I investigated thermal noise on test mass mirrors due to laser light.
  • Cambridge (CAPE) - I studied the fluorescence properties of dyed liquid crystals.

I have a strong interest in computing and its uses in the financial markets, as well as in the entertainment industry. I have developed a handful of small web applications, and am always thinking of new ideas to try out!